The following recommendations are a compilation of answers given by the 25 professors interviewed when we asked them what they read, how they kept informed and what works they consulted related to the topic of entrepreneurial journalism.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

The professors interviewed use a wide and diverse source of texts to develop and teach their entrepreneurial journalism courses. These are the five books and manuals the interviewees mentioned the most:

Death to the Mass

Death to the Mass

Jeff Jarvis (2016)

An essay about the future of the news from the perspective of the multiple business models of the media, the various forms of media-audience relationships, and the never-ending evolution of the journalistic narrative.

Innovative Journalism in Latin America

Innovative Journalism in Latin America

Ismael Nafría and Teresa Mioli (2017)

A compilation of articles published on the Knight Center blog that cover projects related to new narratives, distribution and innovative ways of doing business. Available for free.

The Lean Startup

The Lean Startup

Eric Ries (2011)

 A key text which introduces the Agile Methodology for creating companies quickly, using the least resources necessary in order to validate a business idea.

Business Model Generation

Business Model Generation

Alexander Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur (2010)

A text which addresses the challenges of building a business model using the nine essential blocks of the Business Model Canvas.

The Reinvention of The New York Times

The Reinvention of The New York Times

Ismael Nafría (2017)

A comprehensive, detailed look at the evolution of the Gray Lady of U.S. journalism and its organizational transformation, especially in regards to its audience-focused business model. Available for free.

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REFERENCES

We asked the professors we interviewed to name the people they consider to be experts on the topic of entrepreneurial journalism. Many mentioned local leaders, as well as the founders of successful entrepreneurial endeavors. Others mentioned regional and international professionals. This list is a compilation of the names of six experts (in the order of number of mentions) who were were cited as references by the professors we interviewed.

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SOURCES OF INFORMATION

Time after time, the professors we interviewed mentioned two information sources they use to keep up with what happens in the media industry and journalism: Nieman Lab from Harvard University and the Poynter Institute.

However, we also observed that the information consumption habits of these professors are fragmented and biased. The professors recognize that they no longer keep up with the news: the news find them.

Miguel Carvajal said he does not usually seek out specific sources: "The information comes to me. I use Mediagazer - an aggregator service - a lot."

Juan Luis Manfredi also shares this habit and said that, “Twitter is the channel through which I tune into things."

The clearest sign of this pattern of behavior is that professors mentioned a source of information that we did not have on our list: newsletters and personal blogs, published by recognized journalists in specific focus areas. The following sources stood out:

The “Tendenci@s" (Trends) newsletter

de Ismael Nafría

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The IJNet (International Journalists’ Network) newsletter


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The newsletter Laboratorio de Periodismo (Journalism Laboratory)

by The Luca de Tena Foundation

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The Editor & Publisher newsletter


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Miquel Pellicer’s blog


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The Online Journalism blog

by Paul Bradshaw

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Enrique Dans’ blog


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The WAN-IFRA newsletter


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Mark Deuze's blog


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